Cousin Musings

Cousin Musings: The Savannah Gang ~ Sandra, Felicia, Mavis & Luckie!:)

Sweet memories! We miss you San!:)
The Savannah Gang

Advertisements
Standard
Taliaferro

19 February 2010: Follow Friday: Four GeneaGirls and A Guy In Savannah, GA

Expo-Board-CroppedToday, me and my brother Bernard, along with my friend and genea-pal Luckie Daniels of Our Georgia Roots, are headed to Savannah, GA to meet up with genea-pals Felicia of My Nola Heritage and Mavis of Conversations With My Ancestors and Georgia Black Crackers for The Southeast Family History Expo. What started as a “we should do that” conversation one night on Twitter quickly evolved into a real trip. Luckie and I are in Atlanta; Mavis is driving down from North Carolina, and Felicia is coming from Maryland. Our common bond is our love of genealogy and our passion for uncovering and telling the stories of our ancestors. My brother Bernard doesn’t do genealogy, but is very supportive of me. He quickly hopped on board and agreed to drive Luckie and I down to Savannah. We can sit back, relax, and chat up our ancestors while he takes care of the driving.

We plan to pack a lot into this one weekend. Of course there’s the Expo. Then we plan a tour of Savannah with emphasis on its slave culture, and a trip to a former plantation. We’re also gearing up for a genea-session to tackle some of our brick walls. I can’t pass up the opportunity to pick the brains of some very seasoned African-American researchers. I’m bringing the challenge of my great, great grandfather Miles Taliaferro, a major brick wall. I’m sure Luckie, Felicia, and Mavis will come with ancestor challenges that will keep us analyzing and strategizing for hours. Oh, and don’t forget about all of that great Southern Savannah cuisine. A weekend just couldn’t get any better! Four GeneaGirls and A Guy in Savannah, GA.

Standard
Taliaferro

15 February 2010: Monday Madness – Minnie Toliver

In our quest to tell the stories of our ancestors, the fruits of our labors do not always produce a pretty picture. On occasion, we are faced with a dilemma; do we publish our findings, or just file them away as not for public viewing. A recent discovery presented me with such a quandary; to share, or not to share. I have chosen to share. This is a disturbing newspaper article I recently found on one of my Toliver ancestors. It is not a pretty story. I wish I knew more about the circumstances surrounding the event. What was Minnie thinking? What happened to drive her to take such drastic action, and involve another young relative in the process? These are questions that will never be answered.

What happened to Minnie and Laura? The article describes Minnie and Laura as sisters. According to the 1880 census, however, Laura was the daughter of Miles Taliaferro/Toliver (my great, great grandfather), and Minnie was his granddaughter. That would make Minnie Laura’s niece. I believe Minnie was the daughter of Alex Taliaferro, Laura’s brother. I lose track of Minnie after the 1800 census. Laura married Alexander Butler sometime around 1897, and had six children. Laura died sometime after 1930.

[Click on image to enlarge]

TOLIVER-Minnie-news-article1

“Held On The Rail,” The Atlanta Constitution, 29 March 1888, p. 7, col. 1; digital images, Footnote.comhttp://www.footnote.com : assessed 14 February 2010), News and Town Records.

Standard
Taliaferro

12 February 2010: Follow Friday: Welcome To Our New Home!

By sjtaliaferro

Welcome to the new home of I Never Knew My Father. I hope you like the new look. Things were quiet for a few weeks during our “facelift”, but now we’re back with more reflections, research challenges, and ancestor stories. A couple of posts you may have missed during the transition are a birthday shout-out to my brother Bernard on February 8th and the February 10th Wordless Wednesday tribute to Harriet Tubman. If you’re a new follower to I Never Knew My Father, you also may have missed my post A Friend of Friends: Lessons From The Underground Railroad. This post is very dear to my heart, and is a message that cannot be repeated too often. I welcome your comments.

Again, thanks for following I Never Knew My Father. I appreciate your support.

Standard
Taliaferro

10 February 2010: Wordless Wednesday: Harriet Tubman-A Friend Of Friends

By sjtaliaferro

Harriet-Tubman

Conductor-Underground Railroad

Harriet Ross Tubman(circa 1822-10 March 1913).

Born into slavery on the Eastern Shore of Maryland, Tubman gained international acclaim as an Underground Railroad operator, abolitionist, Civil War spy and nurse, suffragist, and humanitarian. After escaping from enslavement in 1849, Tubman dedicated herself to fighting for freedom, equality, and justice for the remainder of her long life, earning her the biblical name “Moses” and a place among the nation’s most famous historical figures.

(Source: http://www.harriettubmanbiography.com/).

[Image Source: http://www.edexcellence.net/flypaper/images. Accessed 10 February 2010]

Standard